I Am Dublin: Joy by Sinead Flynn

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I Am Dublin Flash Fiction

Sinead Flynn

In the second post of our showcase of the I am Dublin Flash Fiction Competition winners we have the pleasure of reading Sinead Flynn's winning entry. From County Meath, Sinéad has enjoyed living in Phibsborough for the past few years. She teaches singing, drama and English language to a variety of wonderful people. Apart from writing Sinéad loves mythology and animals – especially dogs.

Joy
Sinead Flynn

Mick surveyed the anxious faces of his three children with the most disapproving grimace he could muster.

‘Lads I’m very disappointed in ye.’

Katie and Shane lowered their heads while Keith stared wide eyed at the two guards standing to his left.

‘How many times have I said Mrs O’Reilly’s garden is out of bounds for ye and that bloody dog? Look at the trouble you’ve caused…’

‘But Da we didn’t kick the ball in on purpose. Mrs O’Reilly has it in for us!’ Shane protested.

‘But you shouldn’t have gone in without permission. You should’ve rung her doorbell.’

‘Yeah but…’ Katie had made several attempts to argue their case but the small, grey room and the presence of the guards made her tongue-tied.

‘No buts! Ye didn’t have permission and why the hell was Max running free? You know the rules. He has to be tied or on the lead.’

‘He wanted to play football too!’ Keith piped up.

‘Really? I never knew dogs could talk! When did he tell yis this?’

‘Da’, Katie steadied herself, ‘It was an accident. We can fix up the flowerbeds and pay for the clothes Max chewed with our pocket money.’

‘Your pocket money? You’ll be lucky to get anymore of that! And what about Mrs O?  She’s furious! She said if she sees Max again she’ll have him taken away.’

‘No Da’, Keith sobbed.

Katie wanted to run home to protect Max but she knew the doors were locked and she’d never get past the woman at the front desk.

Shane always the calmest shook his head. ‘Da it won’t happen again. We’ll be careful with Max from now on. We’ll say sorry to Mrs O’Reilly. I still have Christmas money so I’ll give it to her for the clothes.’

‘Good man yourself! Be polite with the aul bat. And tell Max not to be goin’ near aul women’s underwear in future!’

They all laughed. With that a guard stepped forward. ‘Visiting time is over’.

‘Okay guard. Right lads…’

Mick stared at each of them. ‘See ye soon.’

He stepped forward but his handcuffs got in the way of a hug. ‘Love ye lads… and lassie’, he winked at Katie. ‘Take care, be good’.

‘Bye Da.’

‘Bye.’

‘See ya soon Da’.

They waved as two guards led Mick back to his cell.


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  • Breda Kelly on

    Well done Sinead, a delightful short piece of writing.
    I thought the dialogue was very strong and I loved the ending.
    Mrs O sounded like ’an aul bat ’too!

    Keep writing.

    Breda

  • Martin Kelly on

    Enjoyed this humorous ‘leading the reader up the garden path’ piece. The first sentence skilfully introduces the deception and we are led to believe that this is just kids being reprimanded by an ever proper strict father. I loved the man telling them they should have rung the neighbour’s doorbell first and the kids’ defence of the dog saying that he wanted to play football too! The dialogue was great. Loved the slip of the tongue ‘the auld bat’. And then all is revealed in the simple detail of father’s attempt to hug them but for his handcuffs. The irony is what makes this so entertaining.


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